0 notes

(Source: mojalikes, via mindaltering)

993 notes

(Source: scudder47, via blunavyforgrant)

155 notes

This is planet Earth photographed from the surface of Mars by the Curiosity rover. Credits: TAMU/MSSS/JPL-Caltech/Nasa

1 note

vanishingpresence:

Walking to the train - Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan

vanishingpresence:

Walking to the train - Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan

(via japanesesuburbia)

107 notes

hierarchical-aestheticism:

Émile Joachim Constant Puyo

hierarchical-aestheticism:

Émile Joachim Constant Puyo

(Source: my-little-time-machine)

488 notes

champagne: in the Raphäel rooms, vatican museum, roman mosaics, renaissance frescoes, murals & trompe l’oeils, rome, italy, 2012 (digital).

champagne: in the Raphäel rooms, vatican museum, roman mosaics, renaissance frescoes, murals & trompe l’oeils, rome, italy, 2012 (digital).

(via champagne)

580 notes

(Source: flickr.com, via mindaltering)

2,602 notes

Teens weren’t the only ones swept up in Beatlemania. Some of America’s greatest artists fell under their spell. Poet Allen Ginsberg leapt up to dance the first time he heard “I Want to Hold Your Hand” in a New York club. Composer Leonard Bernstein rhapsodized about the Sullivan appearance, “I fell in love with the Beatles’ music — the ineluctable beat, the Schubert-like flow of musical invention and the Fuck-You coolness of the Four Horsemen of Our Apocalypse.” Bob Dylan, who had just released The Times They Are A-Changin’, saw the future. “They were doing things nobody was doing,” Dylan said in 1971. “Their chords were outrageous. It was obvious to me they had staying power. I knew they were pointing in the direction of where music had to go.”


Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/lists/100-greatest-beatles-songs-20110919/i-want-to-hold-your-hand-19691231#ixzz2vyfkdHsT

0 notes

(Source: craigslistmirrors)

405 notes